Book Review, Interview, and Giveaway: Paris Ever After by K.S.R. Burns

 

Paris Ever After

Paris Ever After

(women’s fiction)

Release date: May 1st, 2018
at Velvet Morning Press

ASIN: B079H32ND3
260 pages

 

SYNOPSIS:

Can Amy’s rocky start in Paris turn into a happy ever after?

Amy didn’t realize how stale her life was until she jetted off to Paris without telling a soul—not even her husband—and had the adventure of a lifetime. Now as she tries to establish herself in the City of Light, she finds that despite a fun (and quirky) group of friends and the ability to indulge in French pastries whenever she wants, reinventing her life is much harder than she imagined.

Then on Amy’s thirtieth birthday, two unexpected visitors leave her wondering if she will soon be saying au revoir to Paris and the new life she’s struggled to build. Her estranged husband, Will, shows up—but is he interested in reconciliation or separation? And a young woman who arrives on Amy’s doorstep unleashes chaos that could push Amy out into the street.

As Amy’s Parisian dream starts to fall apart, she must decide: return to the stability of Will and Phoenix (if that’s even still an option) or forge her way forward in Paris? Amid secrets and surprises, set in enchanting gardens, cozy cafés, and glittering Parisian streets, Amy must choose between two very different worlds. And each has a claim on her heart.

NB: The author’s previous book, The Paris Effect, featured here on France Book Tours, was just optioned for Film & TV!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

k-s-r-burns

K. S. R. Burns
is the author of the Amazon bestseller,
THE PARIS EFFECT, its upcoming standalone sequel PARIS EVER AFTER, and THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF WORKING GIRL:
Real-Life Career Advice You Can Actually Use.  She has lived and worked in four countries and 22 cities, including Paris.  No longer a wanderer, Burns now resides in the Pacific Northwest, where in addition to novels she writes a weekly career advice column for she Seattle Times.

Visit her website.
Follow her on Facebook, Twitter
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Buy the book: Amazon | Kobo | iTunes | Nook

Author Interview:

Why did you choose Paris as the main setting for The Paris Effect and Paris Ever After?
Well, they say write what you know—so because I lived in Paris for a number of years it seemed natural to set my books there. Also, writing about Paris is a way to “be” in Paris, even when you are somewhere else entirely!

Can you use one word to describe the places you called home: Paris, Arizona, Virginia, Washington DC, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Minnesota, California, and Washington State? 
Other than the fact that all these places are located on Planet Earth, they have very little in common, don’t you think? So I guess that one word could only be “terrestrial.”
(Sorry, I meant one word per city)

If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be? 
I’d live in Paris during the winter and Seattle during the summer. That would be the best of both worlds, weather-wise. And fun-wise.

What is your favorite under-appreciated novel?
Get ready, because this is an odd one: I LOVE In This House of Brede by Rumer Godden. She’s a fantastic writer and it’s a wonderful book.

How did you select the names of your characters?
I named my main character “Amy” because it reminds me of “aimer,” the French verb for love. I chose “William” for her husband because I wanted the contrast of a short name versus a longer name. I chose the name “Kat” because it’s a sharp sound, and this character has a sharpness about her. Margaret is named after a lovely English lady I met while hiking the Cotswold Way in southwestern England. She was charming and gracious and welcoming (and just slightly loony), like Amy’s Margaret.

What was the hardest scene to write?
In The Paris Effect, the hardest scene by far was the adventure in the illegal portion of the catacombs. It’s a scary place that I haven’t ever visited (you could not pay me to go  own there, though I have visited the tourist portion). In Paris Ever After it was, of course, the sex scene!

Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?
A writing friend who works on screenplays introduced me to the concept of “unifying filmic devices.” Basically, this is just a repeating image. Often they’re symbols, but they don’t have to be. I liked the idea, so in Paris Ever After I sprinkled around mentions of flowers. In The Paris Effect, it was puzzles (jigsaw, crossword). No one seems to have noticed or, if they have, they haven’t told me!

When developing characters do you already know who they are before you
begin writing or do you let them develop as you go?
My characters reveal themselves slowly. Sometimes they surprise me. I may start by basing them on a person I’ve met (like Margaret), but they quickly evolve off into other directions.

Can you describe the mundane details of your writing process: Do you write every day?/ How many hours per day or section?  Do you use outline or draft?  If you do, on paper or computer?
Sadly, my life is not very organized or scheduled. I write whenever and wherever I can. My only halfway interesting quirk is that I always write my first drafts in longhand, on scrap paper. This way I’m not wasting paper with my bad first drafts. I hate to waste paper.

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be?
I would say don’t waste energy trying to be “original.” There are no new stories in this old world (though there are perhaps new ways of doing old things). The only thing that’s really new is you! So give your writing something of yourself.

When you wrote The Paris Effect, did you have the sequel(s) planned out?  Is
there another one after Paris Ever After?
When I finished The Paris Effect I never had the intention of writing a sequel. I felt done. But then readers kept asking me, What happens next? So I started to wonder, and voilà, a new book was born.

What are you working on?  Can you share a little of your current work with us?
I am thinking about a new book and making notes. But it’s in that fragile, delicate stage where I’m afraid to talk about it. Stay tuned…..

My Review:

Paris Ever After is the sequel of The Paris Effect.  I did not have the chance to read the first book before Paris Ever After, so I was reading it as a stand-alone.  The author explains very well throughout book to tell the readers what happened in the first book or what events had happened.  I felt like I have read The Paris Effect and did not miss anything.

Burns is a excellent tour guide for Paris.   She does not only mentions the famous attraction like Notre Dame, Eiffel Tower, etc.  She includes facts and data (I have not done any research on their accuracy) that most American tourists do not know.  I love how she also includes the French culture in the book, from greeting to coffee choices.

I like how all the secrets slowly reveal in this fast-pacing book.  None of the characters is perfect.  They all have flaws.  Some of them are even unlikable,  but somehow those characters are the most interest ones in the book.  I really enjoyed this book, and would recommend this book to those who want to have a vacation in Paris.

3.5 out of 5 Stars
Received a free eCopy from France Book Tours and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

CLICK ON THE BANNER TO READ OTHER REVIEWS, EXCERPTS, AND INTERVIEW

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GIVEAWAY:

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4 comments

  1. Thanks for your review! I’m pretty sure all the “facts and data” about Paris are correct….can say this because my lovely editor lives in Paris (has been there for years) and is married to a Frenchman. So she would definitely have found any errors. At least I hope so!

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